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Attention: New Online Class, Appropriate for Olorishas and Aborishas with Warriors

Course Title: Working the Warriors, Elegguá, Ogún, Ochosi, and Ósun.

 

Date and Time: It begins October 11, 2016, and meets every Tuesday night online from 4:00 PM to 5:30 PM Pacific Standard Time (7:00 PM to 8:30 PM EST).

 

Working the Warriors is a 12 week course appropriate for aborishas who have warriors and for Olorishas (especially if you have godchildren to train). This is a course teaching the patakís supporting the reception of the warriors (Elegguá, Ogún, Ochosi, and Ósun), and it is camino-specific for the attendees. In it we will cover information, patakís, and special ebós for the roads of Elegguá and Ogún represented in the room (Ogún will be time-dependent). Ebós and obras for working the orishas Elegguá, Ogún, and Ochosi will be covered. Please note that an obra is a work, and is not dependent on divination. It is an ebó used when one needs work done. The cost for this three month course is $300.00, and class size is limited to 10 participants.  Due to the sensitive nature of this material, students will not be provided with recordings; however, class recordings will be made and will be viewable for twenty-four hours following each class on YouTube.

 

To register: email BStuartAcevedo@gmail.com OR private message me on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ochani.lele

An old journal entry about Obatala

Every year I come back to reread this short essay. This year, I thought I’d share it again, hoping to reach a new crop of aborishas, iyawós, and even some olorishas. The most beautiful orisha in Olódumare’s creation is so often overlooked. At some point in life, no matter what orisha is crowned, everyone is held accountable to Obatalá. And no matter what the transgression or the reason for it, Obatalá always forgives.

Ócháni Lele

December 10, 2007
I was in my ocha room this morning, putting fresh flowers to Obatalá and redecorating her shrine. Each time I add something to her, each time I rearrange her implements, each time I clean her and refresh her, I stand back, and cry. Being her child, I know I am heavily prejudiced, but I can’t think of any orisha more beautiful than Obatalá.

Especially my road of Obatalá, Obánlá.

Today, however, I remembered another iyawó who was about to go to the river. She thought I had Oshún crowned; and while she was waiting for ebó de entrada to begin, she told me, “I really wanted to be crowned with your orisha, Oshún.” Before I could correct her, she continued, “I wanted to be crowned any orisha EXCEPT Obatalá.”

The word “except” plunged into my heart like a sharp knife cuts through butter. Only one word came…

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An old journal entry about Obatala

December 10, 2007
I was in my ocha room this morning, putting fresh flowers to Obatalá and redecorating her shrine. Each time I add something to her, each time I rearrange her implements, each time I clean her and refresh her, I stand back, and cry. Being her child, I know I am heavily prejudiced, but I can’t think of any orisha more beautiful than Obatalá.

Especially my road of Obatalá, Obánlá.

Today, however, I remembered another iyawó who was about to go to the river. She thought I had Oshún crowned; and while she was waiting for ebó de entrada to begin, she told me, “I really wanted to be crowned with your orisha, Oshún.” Before I could correct her, she continued, “I wanted to be crowned any orisha EXCEPT Obatalá.”

The word “except” plunged into my heart like a sharp knife cuts through butter. Only one word came out of my mouth, “Why?”

She, as many I have met before her, lamented the fact that while Obatalá was a great orisha (“they all have wonderful ashé,” she said, as if she knew what ashé was), he was still a “boring old man.” She went on and on about how colorful the other orishas were, and how much fun they were. I listened until she was done.

And then, I corrected her.

I told her that Obatalá was more than an old man. He was a young man. This she knew.

“But did you know that Obatalá is also . . . a woman? I have a female Obatalá crowned.”

The iyawó listened as I explained to her that out of all the orishas, none knew what it was to truly create save Obatalá. Obatalá created all the heads in heaven; he crafted all the bodies on earth. Obatalá knew what it was like to be drunk; Obatalá even knew what it was like to be high. Obatalá knew cold, hard logic, and he also knew the throes of madness.

Obatalá knew what it was like to be murdered; and, Obatalá knew what it was like . . . to murder. He knew passion. He knew rage. He knew heartache. He knew despair. He knew war.

He created war.

But SHE . . . also knew what it was like to be a young girl. She knew what it was like to be an old woman. She knew what it was like to be a virgin; and, she knew what it was like to be a whore, to use her body to get exactly what she wanted.

She knew what it was like to be young and locked in a loveless, sexless marriage to an older man, and, yes, she knew the pleasures of sexual ecstasy.

And while other orishas might control the moment of conception, it was Obatalá who reached into the womb to mold and guide the new life to birth.

“What does Obatalá NOT know?” I asked the iyawó. “What does she NOT do?”

Before she could answer, they came to take her to do ebó de entrada. I never found out if I changed her mind, or if she ever came to love Obatalá as embracing the full spectrum of divine and human experience. But I do know one thing . . .

Those who have Obatalá crowned are among the most blessed in this religion. At the end of the day, when the other orishas fail us, or even turn their backs on us, it is Obatalá who is the most forgiving, and it is to her . . . or him . . . that all of us must one day turn to for help.

Maferefún Obatalá!

The Basics of Lucumí Divination

On Wednesday, June 15, a new online class begins: The Basics of Lucumí Divination. This is an online course open to olorishas. I use gotomeeting.com as our classroom. There are two learning objectives: teaching the techniques of casting and interpreting obí (the coconut oracle) in a ritual context, and teaching the techniques for casting diloggún. Basic interpretive skills for the diloggún are taught in a separate class.

Instructor: Ócháni Lele (B. Stuart Myers); bstuartmyers@gmail.com.

 Textbook: The Secrets of Afro-Cuban Divination (Destiny Books, 2000). Please note that this textbook is required of all students. I prefer that everyone have a hard copy, not an eBook copy.

 Obi, Oracle of Cuban Santería (Destiny Books, 2001). Please note that this textbook is required of all students. I prefer that everyone have a hard copy, not an eBook copy.

 Recommended texts: For this class, I suggest reading Osogbo: Speaking to the Spirits of Misfortune (Destiny Books, 2014).

 For additional reading, I suggest Teachings of the Santería Gods (Destiny Books, 2010) and Diloggún Tales of the Natural World (Destiny Books, 2011). These books are recommended but not required; they are merely suggestions. Remember: no one has ever dropped dead from reading a book. We are here to expand our minds and learn. I provide additional reading and resource material throughout the course.

 Length of course: the core curriculum consists of thirteen weeks. I have another three weeks booked for you all because, depending on your interests and aptitudes, we may venture into some Lucumí cosmology, ontology, and philosophy. Also, depending on the needs of the class, we might be together a bit longer. It depends on how well we flow in sync with the syllabus, and it depends on how much work you put into your studies. The more you give me as students, the more I give you as your teacher.

 Cost: $250.00

Class Objectives: There are two major objectives in this class: to give students the ability to cast obi in a ritual context and to give students the skills needed to cast diloggún. Interpretive skills for obi are covered in this class; however, interpretive skills for diloggún will be covered in a separate class

Animal Recovery Mission: Their Vendetta

Lawsuit 1

Lawsuit 2

 

As promised, the filing of Animal Recovery Mission against Rooterville, one of the animal havens for the animals they confiscate from family farms. It seems having a poor opinion of A.R.M. lands you in court. Read the documents . . . and give them some critical thought. Some interesting allegations against them were allegedly made.

 

Animal Recovery Mission: Lawsuit Alert

Look what I found. Back in 2015, A.R.M. filed a libel/slander lawsuit against Rooterville. It’s for an amount greater than $15,000. It’s over the condition of the animals from the Coco Farm Raid. And the paperwork is very interesting. I’ll be posting the paperwork soon.

ANIMAL RECOVERY MISSION INC VS ROOTERVILLE A SANCTUARY INC ET AL

Local Case Number: 2015-015148-CA-01

Filing Date: 07/06/2015

State Case Number: 132015CA015148000001

Case Type: Contract & Indebtedness (Greater than $15,000)

Consolidated Case No.: N/A

Judicial Section: CA22

 

Animal Recovery Mission Bio: Richard Couto

Never give an English Major a research assignment – we go big and we go deep. For the next few days we’ll be looking at who Richard Couto is. I’ve done some digging and background research. And because he is an enemy to Olódumare and the orishas, I’ll be publishing everything that I find. It all starts . . . here.

From various websites and professional intelligence sources, I have compiled the following. I have maintained the documentation in my personal archives.

Richard Martin Couto is in his 40s, probably 45 years old or so, and currently lives in Miami, Florida. The last mailing address I have on file for him is 565 53rd St in Miami, Florida, 33137. His personal phone number is 305-494-2225 [I’ve called it – it’s active and it’s his – but the voicemail is full]. His personal email is kudoreef@yahoo.com. Feel free to write him or call him and let him know how you feel about his personal vendetta against us.

He has used various aliases and permutations of his name over the years: Richard Martin Couto, Richard M Couto, Richard Couto, Rich Couto, M Couto Richard, and Richard Martin Couto.

The man seems to have moved many times over the years. These are all the addresses I can find that have been associated with Richard Couto. The date listed with “first seen” is the date he may have become associated with that address. The date listed with “last seen” is the last date of association that can be found with that address. A “last scene” of n/a means he might still be associated with that address somehow:

7308 BELLE MEADE ISLAND DR MIAMI, FL 33138

First seen: 01/09 /2008, Last seen: 01/06/2009

 

208 JEFFERSON AVE APT 114 MIAMI BEACH, FL 33139

First seen: N/A, Last seen: N/A

 

3083 N BAY RD MIAMI BEACH, FL 33140

First seen: 01/11/2004 , Last seen: N/A

 

PO BOX 892 LA JOLLA, CA 92038

First seen: 01/03/2000 , Last seen: 01/03/2000

 

808 NE 73RD ST MIAMI, FL 33138

First seen: N/A, Last seen: N/A

 

3917 N MERIDIAN AVE APT 2 MIAMI BEACH, FL 331400

First seen: N/A, Last seen: N/A

 

PO BOX 1191 NEWPORT , RI 02840

First seen: N/A, Last seen: N/A

 

935 JEFFERSON AVE APT 4 MIAMI BEACH, FL 33139

First seen: N/A, Last seen: N/A

 

17880 NE 31ST CT APT 2112 AVENT URA, FL 33160

First seen: 0 1/0 3/19 9 5, Last seen: 0 1/0 3/19 9 5

 

15 WEBST ER ST NEWPORT , RI 02840

First seen: N/A, Last seen: N/A

 

1830 MERIDIAN AVE APT 1405 MIAMI BEACH, FL 33139

First seen: N/A, Last seen: N/A

 

PO BOX 1151 NEWPORT , RI 02840

First seen: N/A, Last seen: N/A

 

29 PLEASANT ST APT 3 MARBLEH HEAD, MA 01945

First seen: N/A, Last seen: N/A

 

397 GIBBS AVE NEWPORT , RI 02840

First seen: 0 1/0 3/19 9 5, Last seen: 0 1/0 3/19 9 5

 

Tomorrow, we’ll continue looking more deeply into the life of Richard Couto.